Welcome Forum The Drag Strip Barrett Jackson Palm Beach

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by circletrack circletrack 8 years, 1 month ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #5415
    GTO Man
    GTO Man
    Moderator

    Interesting auction. A ’67 Corvette which sold for $170,000 in the recent past sold for $70,000. Another ’65 with a 327 2 speed automatic went for around $40,000. A nice ’69 350 4 speed went for $18,750. Might be time to look for one.

    Resto-mods were bringing big money. 3 ’70 and ’71 442’s from the same restoration shop brought decent money.

    A nice retractable went for $30,000.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #39657
    Avatar
    Anonymous

    I thought prices, overall, were very reasonable.

    I was closely watching four 70-72 Chevelle convertibles. Three of them sold for less than $35K and the other one brought $77K, but it was a real deal SS four speed concours correct car that was so nice that it would have to be trailered.

    Those other three Chevelle were also very nice.

    Marshall

    #39658
    Amigo2k
    Amigo2k
    Moderator

    There was for sure several cars where the right folks were in the room to raise the bid.
    An example of this was was a non-ram air 1969 convertible GTO that went for 80k. Typically they sell for in the 30-40k range.

    And what was the deal with letting little kids bid and sign for cars. I want to see the cars not watch people.

    There is one bidder that typically buys 10 cars at each auction. Fat, white guy, with suspenders that sits down near the front … how did he come into his pile of cash? Well in 2009 he won 90 million with a winning lottery ticket.

    #39659
    GTO Man
    GTO Man
    Moderator
    Amigo2k wrote:
    There was for sure several cars where the right folks were in the room to raise the bid.
    An example of this was was a non-ram air 1969 convertible GTO that went for 80k. Typically they sell for in the 30-40k range.

    And what was the deal with letting little kids bid and sign for cars. I want to see the cars not watch people.

    There is one bidder that typically buys 10 cars at each auction. Fat, white guy, with suspenders that sits down near the front … how did he come into his pile of cash? Well in 2009 he won 90 million with a winning lottery ticket.

    I would agree, the kids don’t need to be bidding. I get all teary eyed(NOT) when some of the bidder’s start crying(usually because they have been drinking heavily), especially when buying the charity cars.

    Nice to see that a recent lottery winner hasn’t been picked clean by the vultures.

    #39660
    Avatar
    Anonymous
    Amigo2k wrote:
    There is one bidder that typically buys 10 cars at each auction. Fat, white guy, with suspenders that sits down near the front … how did he come into his pile of cash? Well in 2009 he won 90 million with a winning lottery ticket.

    What is he doing with all those cars he has purchased the past couple of years?

    #39662
    Amigo2k
    Amigo2k
    Moderator

    They did say he had 6 for sale at the Palm Beach Auction.

    I wouldn’t mind taking a tour of his facility …

    #39663
    circletrack
    circletrack
    Participant

    I’d love to go through Hendrick Motorsports.. Rick always buys great cars and sold quite a few this year too, let alone the first class racing facility located there :)

    #39661
    Avatar
    Anonymous
    Amigo2k wrote:
    There is one bidder that typically buys 10 cars at each auction. Fat, white guy, with suspenders that sits down near the front … how did he come into his pile of cash? Well in 2009 he won 90 million with a winning lottery ticket.

    This article was originally written by Rich Taylor for the Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach catalog.

    “What would you do if you won the lottery?”

    “Why, buy all the cars I ever wanted, price no object.”

    A custom 1937 Ford convertible was built to evoke the world-beating styling of that pivotal year. (Photo: Barrett-Jackson) Fellow car nuts, meet Donald Damon, a retired truck driver living the good life in Great Bend, Kansas, after winning a 2009 Powerball jackpot worth $96.6 million. He immediately started attending Barrett-Jackson auctions.

    As Damon told The Wichita Eagle a few months ago, “Barrett-Jackson’s quality is very high. I tell guys they need to go to a Barrett-Jackson auction. You don’t even have to buy a car; the auction is worth seeing all by itself!”

    Damon, however, does buy cars. So many, in fact, that he also purchased the former General Motors dealership in Great Bend and started D&B Motors, LLC, his own classic-car showroom. His collection has now outgrown the dealership, so he’s selling a few cars to make room for new purchases.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.